Cultural Backlash - 2: The Written Word


This is the seventh article in the culture series

In the previous article: http://reflectionsvvk.blogspot.in/2013/04/cultural-backlash-1-language-issue.html we had looked at the language aspect of the backlash - and how the vernacular is making a strong comeback. This article carries on from there and examines the backlash in literature and culture. This article has been penned largely because of a facebook chat between Manreet Sodhi Someshwar {Author - The Taj Conspiracy}  and myself; it was her idea that enabled me to take this series forward... 

When I refer to literature here, I am referring to the reading habits of the common man as I have observed in book stores across India - what books are purchased or browsed, and what is the range available. Being a bookaholic, a book store is among the first places I visit in any new city. And, considering that online stores contribute only 12% of book sales, this can be taken as representative. 

Circa 1982 - 84, when I used to visit book-stalls in Gwalior with my elder sister and Dad every month, the books on display would be almosr exclusively English titles by western authors. This is the general trend that continued for much of the 80 and 90s decade; I was a regular in book stores, and such local literature as I observed would be either almost a second-grade finish; or absent. It was not in vogue. Indian English literature was also nearly non-existent, with the large number of Indian books being either on esoteric topics, or way too highly priced. Indian English Fiction was non-existent; Vernacular language fiction and books were frankly off poor print quality. The Non-Fiction category was practically absent, at least in terms of visibility. 

There was a clear trend to regard the vernacular thrillers as second-grade; the Urban educated youth - including me and my friends - would read Enid Blyton, Nancy Drew, Robert Ludlum, Alistair Maclean , Archies etc. The only exception would be Champak or Panchatantra - in English. This was the scenario as it existed even upto the early part of the previous decade. Hindi or Marathi or Vernacular poets, literature etc would not even cross our minds. And let me be frank: there was a persistent impression among all of us that our local literature was not upto the mark - in any language. 

A PAUSE...
Let us take a pause at this point and ask ourselves a few questions. We have a rich heritage from our past, starting with The Vedas, The Upanishads, The Purans, The Ramayana, The Mahabharata from our ancient ages. In the Middle Ages we had superb well-known poets like Kabir, Tulsidas, Amir Khusrow etc. In the modern ages, we have had an awesome lineup of poets and writers in each of our local languages - people will remember the name of Rabindranath Tagore. But there were plenty of others who were present - Shivmangal Singh Suman, Harivansha Rai "Bachhan" etc. And yet, when asked about our literary heritage, we can recall only The Ramayana and The Mahabharata (principally due to their religious links); some of us might recall a few lines of Kabirdas, some might even recall Abhigyaan Shaakuntalam; but little else. Most of us have heard of Madhushaala of Shri Harivansha Rai "Bachchan", but how many have a copy, or have read it?

On the other hand,  if you talk of English playwrights and poets, we can rattle off their titles and plays and poems like parrots. Shakespeare's Macbeth can be recalled play-by-play and scene-by-scene by any number of people; art schools and dramatists still revel in holding any number of plays of Macbeth and other Shakespearean dramas. Why not Abhigyaan Shaakuntalam? Why not any of the other Indian plays? We still - as on date 2013 - dont want to read about Madhushala, or any of Rabindranath Tagore's poems, or even the iconic Khoob Ladi Mardaani by Subhadra Kumari. And yet, we can rattle of the names of Yeats, Kipling etc almost at the speed of light! 


This is the colonial mindset; the impact of colonialism. It is sad to see the degradation that the vernacular languages have been subjected to. The modern Urban Indian attaches a disproportionate importance to English; this is an established fact. So much so that the market for Indian Language products lacks depth, and is severely under-represented. Talking of Share-Of-Mind, English has captivated us all in the Urban Markets - especially the convent and/or Public School educated people. The reading skills in the local tongue are, quite simply, abysmal. 

If it was only about Language, it would not be so bad; unfortunately, this spans the entire cultural spectrum. I will look at the other aspects of this fawning over the west in a later article; here my focus is on the written word. As we have seen above, Indian Writings on Indian topics were also almost non-existent. After our Epics, all was blank. We read only about the World Wars, European Renaissance, Kipling, Wodehouse, Yeats, Somerset Maugham, Barbara Cartland etc. 

MOVING ON...
Happily, this is what is changing - and changing quite rapidly. How did this transform to the scene we now see today? The reasons for this are manifold - the increasing per capita income brought about by economic liberalisation would have been one important factor that cannot be overlooked. Increasing educational levels,  widening markets, greater visibility and penetration of TV, internet all would have been powerful motivators to bring about this change. Whatever may the reason be, Indian Literature is now on a discernible upswing with contributors like Shashi Tharoor, Devadutta Pattanaik, Pavan K Verma, Manreet Sodhi Someshwar, Ravi Subramanian, Ashwin Sanghi, Mukul Deva (to name but a few) in both the fiction as well as the non-fiction genres. I call this the start of the cultural backlash in Literature: as this time, they are finding a market. The topics covered by these writers is also widening in scope; while earlier we had to rely on William Dalrymple for our dosage of historical / fiction (as an example), we now have Manreet Sodhi Someshwar and Ashwin Sanghi producing books on this genre in India in the fiction genre- and renowned authors like Jaswant Singh, Pankaj Mishra and Shashi Tharoor in the Non-Fiction genre. Happily, the books are now main-stream - unlike earlier. To take another example, Mukul Deva is now the first thriller writer from India; while Naveen Jagannathan's first book of short stories was extremely well received. 

The Urban Indian is fast taking to Indian Writing in droves, that we can see above. The reason behind this is simple economics; an English - Speaking population with cash to spend is a powerful incentive. This caused a few talented people to come in and create a market where none existed. Their books are now finding equal space in book-shelves across India - all of which now sport exclusive Indian Fiction and Non-Fiction shelves. Since we still disregard the Vernacular in Urban India - I am terming it as the start of the cultural backlash. A true cultural backlash would require equal space to the vernacular- which, as of today, seems some way off. Having said that, the current trend of translations of best-sellers to local languages - authorised versions in quality product form - is a good start, as it is indicative of the presence of a market for such products in the vernacular. From here, it is only a short step to the first ever Local Language Best-Seller... and that will be the true Cultural Backlash in Literature. There are other indications of this happening - the deepening penetration of regional channels, the increasing awareness and success of regional movies and television serial for example. But that is another story, to be taken up later on in this series... for now, let us enjoy this resurgence in Indian Literature. Even if it is in English! In closing, let us read the icnonic hindi poem referred above, just to remind ourselves of the power of Indian Poets..

सिंहासन हिल उठे राजवंशों ने भृकुटी तानी थी,
बूढ़े भारत में आई फिर से नयी जवानी थी,
गुमी हुई आज़ादी की कीमत सबने पहचानी थी,
दूर फिरंगी को करने की सबने मन में ठानी थी।
चमक उठी सन सत्तावन में, वह तलवार पुरानी थी,
बुंदेले हरबोलों के मुँह हमने सुनी कहानी थी,
खूब लड़ी मर्दानी वह तो झाँसी वाली रानी थी।।

कानपूर के नाना की, मुँहबोली बहन छबीली थी,
लक्ष्मीबाई नाम, पिता की वह संतान अकेली थी,
नाना के सँग पढ़ती थी वह, नाना के सँग खेली थी,
बरछी ढाल, कृपाण, कटारी उसकी यही सहेली थी।
वीर शिवाजी की गाथायें उसकी याद ज़बानी थी,
बुंदेले हरबोलों के मुँह हमने सुनी कहानी थी,
खूब लड़ी मर्दानी वह तो झाँसी वाली रानी थी।।

लक्ष्मी थी या दुर्गा थी वह स्वयं वीरता की अवतार,
देख मराठे पुलकित होते उसकी तलवारों के वार,
नकली युद्ध-व्यूह की रचना और खेलना खूब शिकार,
सैन्य घेरना, दुर्ग तोड़ना ये थे उसके प्रिय खिलवार।
महाराष्टर-कुल-देवी उसकी भी आराध्य भवानी थी,
बुंदेले हरबोलों के मुँह हमने सुनी कहानी थी,
खूब लड़ी मर्दानी वह तो झाँसी वाली रानी थी।।

हुई वीरता की वैभव के साथ सगाई झाँसी में,
ब्याह हुआ रानी बन आई लक्ष्मीबाई झाँसी में,
राजमहल में बजी बधाई खुशियाँ छाई झाँसी में,
चित्रा ने अर्जुन को पाया, शिव से मिली भवानी थी,
बुंदेले हरबोलों के मुँह हमने सुनी कहानी थी,
खूब लड़ी मर्दानी वह तो झाँसी वाली रानी थी।।

उदित हुआ सौभाग्य, मुदित महलों में उजियाली छाई,
किंतु कालगति चुपके-चुपके काली घटा घेर लाई,
तीर चलाने वाले कर में उसे चूड़ियाँ कब भाई,
रानी विधवा हुई, हाय! विधि को भी नहीं दया आई।
निसंतान मरे राजाजी रानी शोक-समानी थी,
बुंदेले हरबोलों के मुँह हमने सुनी कहानी थी,
खूब लड़ी मर्दानी वह तो झाँसी वाली रानी थी।।

बुझा दीप झाँसी का तब डलहौज़ी मन में हरषाया,
राज्य हड़प करने का उसने यह अच्छा अवसर पाया,
फ़ौरन फौजें भेज दुर्ग पर अपना झंडा फहराया,
लावारिस का वारिस बनकर ब्रिटिश राज्य झाँसी आया।
अश्रुपूर्णा रानी ने देखा झाँसी हुई बिरानी थी,
बुंदेले हरबोलों के मुँह हमने सुनी कहानी थी,
खूब लड़ी मर्दानी वह तो झाँसी वाली रानी थी।।

अनुनय विनय नहीं सुनती है, विकट शासकों की माया,
व्यापारी बन दया चाहता था जब यह भारत आया,
डलहौज़ी ने पैर पसारे, अब तो पलट गई काया,
राजाओं नव्वाबों को भी उसने पैरों ठुकराया।
रानी दासी बनी, बनी यह दासी अब महरानी थी,
बुंदेले हरबोलों के मुँह हमने सुनी कहानी थी,
खूब लड़ी मर्दानी वह तो झाँसी वाली रानी थी।।

छिनी राजधानी दिल्ली की, लखनऊ छीना बातों-बात,
कैद पेशवा था बिठुर में, हुआ नागपुर का भी घात,
उदैपुर, तंजौर, सतारा, करनाटक की कौन बिसात?
जबकि सिंध, पंजाब ब्रह्म पर अभी हुआ था वज्र-निपात।
बंगाले, मद्रास आदि की भी तो वही कहानी थी,
बुंदेले हरबोलों के मुँह हमने सुनी कहानी थी,
खूब लड़ी मर्दानी वह तो झाँसी वाली रानी थी।।

रानी रोयीं रिनवासों में, बेगम ग़म से थीं बेज़ार,
उनके गहने कपड़े बिकते थे कलकत्ते के बाज़ार,
सरे आम नीलाम छापते थे अंग्रेज़ों के अखबार,
'नागपूर के ज़ेवर ले लो लखनऊ के लो नौलख हार'।
यों परदे की इज़्ज़त परदेशी के हाथ बिकानी थी,
बुंदेले हरबोलों के मुँह हमने सुनी कहानी थी,
खूब लड़ी मर्दानी वह तो झाँसी वाली रानी थी।।

कुटियों में भी विषम वेदना, महलों में आहत अपमान,
वीर सैनिकों के मन में था अपने पुरखों का अभिमान,
नाना धुंधूपंत पेशवा जुटा रहा था सब सामान,
बहिन छबीली ने रण-चण्डी का कर दिया प्रकट आहवान।
हुआ यज्ञ प्रारम्भ उन्हें तो सोई ज्योति जगानी थी,
बुंदेले हरबोलों के मुँह हमने सुनी कहानी थी,
खूब लड़ी मर्दानी वह तो झाँसी वाली रानी थी।।

महलों ने दी आग, झोंपड़ी ने ज्वाला सुलगाई थी,
यह स्वतंत्रता की चिनगारी अंतरतम से आई थी,
झाँसी चेती, दिल्ली चेती, लखनऊ लपटें छाई थी,
मेरठ, कानपूर, पटना ने भारी धूम मचाई थी,
जबलपूर, कोल्हापूर में भी कुछ हलचल उकसानी थी,
बुंदेले हरबोलों के मुँह हमने सुनी कहानी थी,
खूब लड़ी मर्दानी वह तो झाँसी वाली रानी थी।।

इस स्वतंत्रता महायज्ञ में कई वीरवर आए काम,
नाना धुंधूपंत, ताँतिया, चतुर अज़ीमुल्ला सरनाम,
अहमदशाह मौलवी, ठाकुर कुँवरसिंह सैनिक अभिराम,
भारत के इतिहास गगन में अमर रहेंगे जिनके नाम।
लेकिन आज जुर्म कहलाती उनकी जो कुरबानी थी,
बुंदेले हरबोलों के मुँह हमने सुनी कहानी थी,
खूब लड़ी मर्दानी वह तो झाँसी वाली रानी थी।।

इनकी गाथा छोड़, चले हम झाँसी के मैदानों में,
जहाँ खड़ी है लक्ष्मीबाई मर्द बनी मर्दानों में,
लेफ्टिनेंट वाकर आ पहुँचा, आगे बड़ा जवानों में,
रानी ने तलवार खींच ली, हुया द्वन्द्ध असमानों में।
ज़ख्मी होकर वाकर भागा, उसे अजब हैरानी थी,
बुंदेले हरबोलों के मुँह हमने सुनी कहानी थी,
खूब लड़ी मर्दानी वह तो झाँसी वाली रानी थी।।

रानी बढ़ी कालपी आई, कर सौ मील निरंतर पार,
घोड़ा थक कर गिरा भूमि पर गया स्वर्ग तत्काल सिधार,
यमुना तट पर अंग्रेज़ों ने फिर खाई रानी से हार,
विजयी रानी आगे चल दी, किया ग्वालियर पर अधिकार।
अंग्रेज़ों के मित्र सिंधिया ने छोड़ी रजधानी थी,
बुंदेले हरबोलों के मुँह हमने सुनी कहानी थी,
खूब लड़ी मर्दानी वह तो झाँसी वाली रानी थी।।

विजय मिली, पर अंग्रेज़ों की फिर सेना घिर आई थी,
अबके जनरल स्मिथ सम्मुख था, उसने मुहँ की खाई थी,
काना और मंदरा सखियाँ रानी के संग आई थी,
युद्ध श्रेत्र में उन दोनों ने भारी मार मचाई थी।
पर पीछे ह्यूरोज़ आ गया, हाय! घिरी अब रानी थी,
बुंदेले हरबोलों के मुँह हमने सुनी कहानी थी,
खूब लड़ी मर्दानी वह तो झाँसी वाली रानी थी।।

तो भी रानी मार काट कर चलती बनी सैन्य के पार,
किन्तु सामने नाला आया, था वह संकट विषम अपार,
घोड़ा अड़ा, नया घोड़ा था, इतने में आ गये अवार,
रानी एक, शत्रु बहुतेरे, होने लगे वार-पर-वार।
घायल होकर गिरी सिंहनी उसे वीर गति पानी थी,
बुंदेले हरबोलों के मुँह हमने सुनी कहानी थी,
खूब लड़ी मर्दानी वह तो झाँसी वाली रानी थी।।

रानी गई सिधार चिता अब उसकी दिव्य सवारी थी,
मिला तेज से तेज, तेज की वह सच्ची अधिकारी थी,
अभी उम्र कुल तेइस की थी, मनुज नहीं अवतारी थी,
हमको जीवित करने आयी बन स्वतंत्रता-नारी थी,
दिखा गई पथ, सिखा गई हमको जो सीख सिखानी थी,
बुंदेले हरबोलों के मुँह हमने सुनी कहानी थी,
खूब लड़ी मर्दानी वह तो झाँसी वाली रानी थी।।

जाओ रानी याद रखेंगे ये कृतज्ञ भारतवासी,
यह तेरा बलिदान जगावेगा स्वतंत्रता अविनासी,
होवे चुप इतिहास, लगे सच्चाई को चाहे फाँसी,
हो मदमाती विजय, मिटा दे गोलों से चाहे झाँसी।
तेरा स्मारक तू ही होगी, तू खुद अमिट निशानी थी,
बुंदेले हरबोलों के मुँह हमने सुनी कहानी थी,
खूब लड़ी मर्दानी वह तो झाँसी वाली रानी थी।।

By: सुभद्रा कुमारी चौहान

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

PK, The Movie : One Of The Best...

Pink Movie - Asking The Right Questions Of The Man!